The Louvre‘s Quest For A 16th Century Masterpiece

November 17, 2010 § Leave a comment

The Louvre Museum in France is launching a public campaign to raise one million euros (£846,000) to acquire a 16th-century masterpiece. The campaign is a first in the museum’s 217-year history. The 16th century piece of art, Les Trois Grâces, was produced in by German artist Lucas Cranach. If you clicked on the link, you will see that “Les Trois Graces” features three naked women against a dark platform. This masterpiece is barely bigger than an A4 piece of paper; however, it is considered a national treasure and a “museum icon.” In the beginning, the Louvre raised about three million euros, but fell short of its goal of four million Euros (the amount demanded by the painting’s owner). Now, the museum is working on soliciting donations from the public. These efforts, unfortunately, have been met with negative reactions. One commenter mentioned that he was “very disappointed with the Louvre … this museum is already largely funded by our taxes and I find this unacceptable." I cannot help but wonder: with the deep reliance on government and corporate sponsorships, are European cultural institutions ready to adjust to new fundraising platform? In fact, are European individuals willing to extend their philanthropic arm like their American counterparts? I guess we will just have to wait and see.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/15/louvre-les-trois-graces-appeal

~Ahlam Yusuf~

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